Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
The Chicoutimi Cucumber

What a bung-hole!

Recommended Posts

http://www.cyberpresse.ca/chroniqueurs/rej...s-quebecois.php

Not sure why I'm moved to post this here; it's on the main page under the 'media links,' and this topic has of course been hashed out before - it's a symptom of my boiling blood, I suppose. To say that the Habs have no respect for the French fact in Quebec and 'abuse Quebecers,' when they have committed to running a permanent affirmative action program for francophone GMs and coaches (unmentioned by this dribbling old hack), is downright enervating. Does Tremblay suppose they are deliberately trying not to have star francophones? They made huge and fortunately unsuccessful plays for Briere and Lecavalier. They drafted Louis Leblanc. They irresponsibly reserve key managerial positions for francophones. They've rejigged their scouting machine in Quebec to be able to draft more Québécois. No dice, this is all window-dressing for Geoff Molson's neo-colonial agenda of consigning the Québécois to the status of wretched of the earth eternally toiling under the crushing burden of a hockey team with too few Quebecers on it. Il sait porter la croix, right? No wait, that's a federalist slogan.

And notice the sly ambiguity about who *really* counts. Jacques Martin and Benoit Pouliot are franco-Ontarians, which presumably is why they are unmentioned in this article. The only thing that matters is that Lapierre is the 'last Québécois.' At the same time, Tremblay attacks captaincy candidate Markov for not showing enough interest in learning French, when by his own 'logic' it wouldn't matter if Markov did, because he's not Québécois. Nice rhetorical move; it allows him to attack individual Habs for not learning French while discounting those Habs who do. (Needless to say, merely residing in Quebec doesn't make you Québécois, no matter what language you speak. You need to get your bloodlines checked first).

Rejean Tremblay needs a lesson in reasonable accomodation all right - preferably up his arse, which is the primary source for his so-called 'journalism.'

Edited by The Chicoutimi Cucumber

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
http://www.cyberpresse.ca/chroniqueurs/rej...s-quebecois.php

Not sure why I'm moved to post this here; it's on the main page under the 'media links,' and this topic has of course been hashed out before - it's a symptom of my boiling blood, I suppose. To say that the Habs have no respect for the French fact in Quebec and 'abuse Quebecers,' when they have committed to running a permanent affirmative action program for francophone GMs and coaches (unmentioned by this dribbling old hack), is downright enervating. Does Tremblay suppose they are deliberately trying not to have star francophones? They made huge and fortunately unsuccessful plays for Briere and Lecavalier. They drafted Louis Leblanc. They irresponsibly reserve key managerial positions for francophones. They've rejigged their scouting machine in Quebec to be able to draft more Québécois. No dice, this is all window-dressing for Geoff Molson's neo-colonial agenda of consigning the Québécois to the status of wretched of the earth eternally toiling under the crushing burden of a hockey team with too few Quebecers on it. Il sait porter la croix, right? No wait, that's a federalist slogan.

And notice the sly ambiguity about who *really* counts. Jacques Martin and Benoit Pouliot are franco-Ontarians, which presumably is why they are unmentioned in this article. The only thing that matters is that Lapierre is the 'last Québécois.' At the same time, Tremblay attacks captaincy candidate Markov for not showing enough interest in learning French, when by his own 'logic' it wouldn't matter if Markov did, because he's not Québécois. Nice rhetorical move; it allows him to attack individual Habs for not learning French while discounting those Habs who do. (Needless to say, merely residing in Quebec doesn't make you Québécois, no matter what language you speak. You need to get your bloodlines checked first).

Rejean Tremblay needs a lesson in reasonable accomodation all right - preferably up his arse, which is the primary source for his so-called 'journalism.'

I know man, Tremblay is an idiot. I already posted about this in the french section on HW.

I sent him an e-mail about that during the playoffs when he wrote his article stating that Darche :puke: should play over SK. You can find a copy in the thread about Boivin and francos.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is how I felt when I read "The Rocket".

Kozed and others tried to explain the Quebecois thing to me but I still don't understand it.

This whole thing regarding the Habs is fed by a much deeper root. It really has nothing to do with our hockey team at all.

Whoever is captain will face the same bigotry that Koivu faced.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Habs never been there to represent the people of the province this is the government job.

One thing thought, Habs should draft the best players from the junior league just in their own backyard,

it's not like the GM couln't make his own idea about a player and only trust his scouts. Just go to the Montreal Junior

games and watch the player. Keep your second,third round picks and draft these prospects.

It's sad to see so very few good prospects coming out from the Q but there are some good ones and

the Habs should not miss them. Hockey Quebec should take a big part of ther blame not to create an elite capable

of developing players to NHL standards.

For myself i will see a lot more junior this year, Quebec Remparts will have a good team, so will Montreal Junior

and Sean Couturier will deserve a good look.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Prime Minister Koivu - the real issue lies in the historical and psychological complexes of Quebec nationalism. For generations French Canadians were a subordinated underclass in their own province, their economy, wealth and upward mobility controlled by English-speakers in general and Montreal's English minority in particular. That's not rhetoric, it's a demonstrable sociological fact that lingered until well into the 1970s. Add that ongoing and grinding day-to-day cultural humiliation with deeper insecurities going back to the conquest of New France by the English and you've got a recipe for an intense concern with personal and collective dignity.

Enter the Habs. At some point in the 1940s, with The Rocket leading the way, the Montreal Canadiens become a symbol of French Canadian success. A humiliated people looked to the hockey team as the vehicle for their frustrated aspirations and dreams, both on a personal level ('I may be a subordinate at work pushed around by English bosses, but goddamn it, my hero the Rocket - a 'tis gars, a little guy just like me - he won't be pushed around by anybody!') and a collective level (it's French Canadians who are conquering the world via the Canadiens).

This helps to explain the quasi-religious intensity with which the Habs have registered in the collective psyche of French Quebec. They became a compensatory device for the oppression to which that community was subject.

The problem is that these issues don't apply any more. They haven't for decades now. Francophone Quebecers are no longer in any way subordinate within Quebec. In fact, they are now in the position of a commanding majority that struggles to come to grips with the necessary restraint required to justly deal with its devastated and dying anglophone minority and cultural minorities rooted in immigration. But the nationalist narrative vis-a-vis the Habs has not died off in some quarters even though the sociological conditions that created it are long gone. Somehow the Habs are STILL supposed to be the vehicle compensating for humiliations and oppressions that no longer exist.

A further pathology of this kind of nationalist hangover is that it contributes to a willful blindness about the real problems. For instance, in hockey terms, the real question is less why the Habs don't have francophone stars than why there are so few elite-level hockey players being produced in Quebec these days. But asking that question might require some self-critical analysis. Easier just to blame The English (read, the Habs and their owners).

It's at best juvenile and at worst racist. Tremblay is both, I fear.

Easy Ryder: no question the Habs should try to scoop up elite talent that comes from their own backyard. That makes good business sense AND good hockey sense. Everybody can agree on that. What's idiotic is attributing the Habs' failures on this score to an intentional effort to 'abuse Quebecers.' This is the emotionally stunted nationalist paranoia that fuels Neanderthals like Tremblay and the knuckle-dragging talk show callers to whom he appeals.

Edited by The Chicoutimi Cucumber

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Prime Minister Koivu - the real issue lies in the historical and psychological complexes of Quebec nationalism. For generations French Canadians were a subordinated underclass in their own province, their economy, wealth and upward mobility controlled by English-speakers in general and Montreal's English minority in particular. That's not rhetoric, it's a demonstrable sociological fact that lingered until well into the 1970s. Add that ongoing and grinding day-to-day cultural humiliation with deeper insecurities going back to the conquest of New France by the English and you've got a recipe for an intense concern with personal and collective dignity.

Enter the Habs. At some point in the 1940s, with The Rocket leading the way, the Montreal Canadiens become a symbol of French Canadian success. A humiliated people looked to the hockey team as the vehicle for their frustrated aspirations and dreams, both on a personal level ('I may be a subordinate at work pushed around by English bosses, but goddamn it, my hero the Rocket - a 'tis gars, a little guy just like me - he won't be pushed around by anybody!') and a collective level (it's French Canadians who are conquering the world via the Canadiens).

This helps to explain the quasi-religious intensity with which the Habs have registered in the collective psyche of French Quebec. They became a compensatory device for the oppression to which that community was subject.

The problem is that these issues don't apply any more. They haven't for decades now. Francophone Quebecers are no longer in any way subordinate within Quebec. In fact, they are now in the position of a commanding majority that struggles to come to grips with the necessary restraint required to justly deal with its devastated and dying anglophone minority and cultural minorities rooted in immigration. But the nationalist narrative vis-a-vis the Habs has not died off in some quarters even though the sociological conditions that created it are long gone. Somehow the Habs are STILL supposed to be the vehicle compensating for humiliations and oppressions that no longer exist.

A further pathology of this kind of nationalist hangover is that it contributes to a willful blindness about the real problems. For instance, in hockey terms, the real question is less why the Habs don't have francophone stars than why there are so few elite-level hockey players being produced in Quebec these days. But asking that question might require some self-critical analysis. Easier just to blame The English (read, the Habs and their owners).

It's at best juvenile and at worst racist. Tremblay is both, I fear.

Easy Ryder: no question the Habs should try to scoop up elite talent that comes from their own backyard. That makes good business sense AND good hockey sense. Everybody can agree on that. What's idiotic is attributing the Habs' failures on this score to an intentional effort to 'abuse Quebecers.' This is the emotionally stunted nationalist paranoia that fuels Neanderthals like Tremblay and the knuckle-dragging talk show callers to whom he appeals.

:clap::clap: Wish I could write in English like you CC... Post moved.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Prime Minister Koivu - the real issue lies in the historical and psychological complexes of Quebec nationalism. For generations French Canadians were a subordinated underclass in their own province, their economy, wealth and upward mobility controlled by English-speakers in general and Montreal's English minority in particular. That's not rhetoric, it's a demonstrable sociological fact that lingered until well into the 1970s. Add that ongoing and grinding day-to-day cultural humiliation with deeper insecurities going back to the conquest of New France by the English and you've got a recipe for an intense concern with personal and collective dignity.

Enter the Habs. At some point in the 1940s, with The Rocket leading the way, the Montreal Canadiens become a symbol of French Canadian success. A humiliated people looked to the hockey team as the vehicle for their frustrated aspirations and dreams, both on a personal level ('I may be a subordinate at work pushed around by English bosses, but goddamn it, my hero the Rocket - a 'tis gars, a little guy just like me - he won't be pushed around by anybody!') and a collective level (it's French Canadians who are conquering the world via the Canadiens).

This helps to explain the quasi-religious intensity with which the Habs have registered in the collective psyche of French Quebec. They became a compensatory device for the oppression to which that community was subject.

The problem is that these issues don't apply any more. They haven't for decades now. Francophone Quebecers are no longer in any way subordinate within Quebec. In fact, they are now in the position of a commanding majority that struggles to come to grips with the necessary restraint required to justly deal with its devastated and dying anglophone minority and cultural minorities rooted in immigration. But the nationalist narrative vis-a-vis the Habs has not died off in some quarters even though the sociological conditions that created it are long gone. Somehow the Habs are STILL supposed to be the vehicle compensating for humiliations and oppressions that no longer exist.

A further pathology of this kind of nationalist hangover is that it contributes to a willful blindness about the real problems. For instance, in hockey terms, the real question is less why the Habs don't have francophone stars than why there are so few elite-level hockey players being produced in Quebec these days. But asking that question might require some self-critical analysis. Easier just to blame The English (read, the Habs and their owners).

It's at best juvenile and at worst racist. Tremblay is both, I fear.

Easy Ryder: no question the Habs should try to scoop up elite talent that comes from their own backyard. That makes good business sense AND good hockey sense. Everybody can agree on that. What's idiotic is attributing the Habs' failures on this score to an intentional effort to 'abuse Quebecers.' This is the emotionally stunted nationalist paranoia that fuels Neanderthals like Tremblay and the knuckle-dragging talk show callers to whom he appeals.

This may be the best post you have ever written CC. :clap:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Prime Minister Koivu - the real issue lies in the historical and psychological complexes of Quebec nationalism. For generations French Canadians were a subordinated underclass in their own province, their economy, wealth and upward mobility controlled by English-speakers in general and Montreal's English minority in particular. That's not rhetoric, it's a demonstrable sociological fact that lingered until well into the 1970s. Add that ongoing and grinding day-to-day cultural humiliation with deeper insecurities going back to the conquest of New France by the English and you've got a recipe for an intense concern with personal and collective dignity.

Enter the Habs. At some point in the 1940s, with The Rocket leading the way, the Montreal Canadiens become a symbol of French Canadian success. A humiliated people looked to the hockey team as the vehicle for their frustrated aspirations and dreams, both on a personal level ('I may be a subordinate at work pushed around by English bosses, but goddamn it, my hero the Rocket - a 'tis gars, a little guy just like me - he won't be pushed around by anybody!') and a collective level (it's French Canadians who are conquering the world via the Canadiens).

This helps to explain the quasi-religious intensity with which the Habs have registered in the collective psyche of French Quebec. They became a compensatory device for the oppression to which that community was subject.

The problem is that these issues don't apply any more. They haven't for decades now. Francophone Quebecers are no longer in any way subordinate within Quebec. In fact, they are now in the position of a commanding majority that struggles to come to grips with the necessary restraint required to justly deal with its devastated and dying anglophone minority and cultural minorities rooted in immigration. But the nationalist narrative vis-a-vis the Habs has not died off in some quarters even though the sociological conditions that created it are long gone. Somehow the Habs are STILL supposed to be the vehicle compensating for humiliations and oppressions that no longer exist.

A further pathology of this kind of nationalist hangover is that it contributes to a willful blindness about the real problems. For instance, in hockey terms, the real question is less why the Habs don't have francophone stars than why there are so few elite-level hockey players being produced in Quebec these days. But asking that question might require some self-critical analysis. Easier just to blame The English (read, the Habs and their owners).

It's at best juvenile and at worst racist. Tremblay is both, I fear.

Easy Ryder: no question the Habs should try to scoop up elite talent that comes from their own backyard. That makes good business sense AND good hockey sense. Everybody can agree on that. What's idiotic is attributing the Habs' failures on this score to an intentional effort to 'abuse Quebecers.' This is the emotionally stunted nationalist paranoia that fuels Neanderthals like Tremblay and the knuckle-dragging talk show callers to whom he appeals.

Perfectly said, the world would be smarter simply by reading this.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bring back 'les Nordiques'!!!

Quebec deserves its old franchise back!

It would be awesome to see it again... for the sake of Quebec, Canada and Montreal Canadiens fan alike.

Matts

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow. An amazing diatribe right there. Seriously, that should be published in some form if it hasn't already. Someone call Boone!

It's got my vote for post of the year! :clap:

Edited by mineral

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I feel dumb after reading that...hope you're happy CC!

I had to actually google some of those words hahahha!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Prime Minister Koivu - the real issue lies in the historical and psychological complexes of Quebec nationalism. For generations French Canadians were a subordinated underclass in their own province, their economy, wealth and upward mobility controlled by English-speakers in general and Montreal's English minority in particular. That's not rhetoric, it's a demonstrable sociological fact that lingered until well into the 1970s. Add that ongoing and grinding day-to-day cultural humiliation with deeper insecurities going back to the conquest of New France by the English and you've got a recipe for an intense concern with personal and collective dignity.

Enter the Habs. At some point in the 1940s, with The Rocket leading the way, the Montreal Canadiens become a symbol of French Canadian success. A humiliated people looked to the hockey team as the vehicle for their frustrated aspirations and dreams, both on a personal level ('I may be a subordinate at work pushed around by English bosses, but goddamn it, my hero the Rocket - a 'tis gars, a little guy just like me - he won't be pushed around by anybody!') and a collective level (it's French Canadians who are conquering the world via the Canadiens).

This helps to explain the quasi-religious intensity with which the Habs have registered in the collective psyche of French Quebec. They became a compensatory device for the oppression to which that community was subject.

The problem is that these issues don't apply any more. They haven't for decades now. Francophone Quebecers are no longer in any way subordinate within Quebec. In fact, they are now in the position of a commanding majority that struggles to come to grips with the necessary restraint required to justly deal with its devastated and dying anglophone minority and cultural minorities rooted in immigration. But the nationalist narrative vis-a-vis the Habs has not died off in some quarters even though the sociological conditions that created it are long gone. Somehow the Habs are STILL supposed to be the vehicle compensating for humiliations and oppressions that no longer exist.

A further pathology of this kind of nationalist hangover is that it contributes to a willful blindness about the real problems. For instance, in hockey terms, the real question is less why the Habs don't have francophone stars than why there are so few elite-level hockey players being produced in Quebec these days. But asking that question might require some self-critical analysis. Easier just to blame The English (read, the Habs and their owners).

It's at best juvenile and at worst racist. Tremblay is both, I fear.

Easy Ryder: no question the Habs should try to scoop up elite talent that comes from their own backyard. That makes good business sense AND good hockey sense. Everybody can agree on that. What's idiotic is attributing the Habs' failures on this score to an intentional effort to 'abuse Quebecers.' This is the emotionally stunted nationalist paranoia that fuels Neanderthals like Tremblay and the knuckle-dragging talk show callers to whom he appeals.

This is so well written and easy to understand. This should be an article on the front page.

Thanks for taking the time to write this.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
This is so well written and easy to understand. This should be an article on the front page.

Thanks for taking the time to write this.

Dont forget to name it "What a bung-hole!" :D

Seriously, great post.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Prime Minister Koivu - the real issue lies in the historical and psychological complexes of Quebec nationalism. For generations French Canadians were a subordinated underclass in their own province, their economy, wealth and upward mobility controlled by English-speakers in general and Montreal's English minority in particular. That's not rhetoric, it's a demonstrable sociological fact that lingered until well into the 1970s. Add that ongoing and grinding day-to-day cultural humiliation with deeper insecurities going back to the conquest of New France by the English and you've got a recipe for an intense concern with personal and collective dignity.

Enter the Habs. At some point in the 1940s, with The Rocket leading the way, the Montreal Canadiens become a symbol of French Canadian success. A humiliated people looked to the hockey team as the vehicle for their frustrated aspirations and dreams, both on a personal level ('I may be a subordinate at work pushed around by English bosses, but goddamn it, my hero the Rocket - a 'tis gars, a little guy just like me - he won't be pushed around by anybody!') and a collective level (it's French Canadians who are conquering the world via the Canadiens).

This helps to explain the quasi-religious intensity with which the Habs have registered in the collective psyche of French Quebec. They became a compensatory device for the oppression to which that community was subject.

The problem is that these issues don't apply any more. They haven't for decades now. Francophone Quebecers are no longer in any way subordinate within Quebec. In fact, they are now in the position of a commanding majority that struggles to come to grips with the necessary restraint required to justly deal with its devastated and dying anglophone minority and cultural minorities rooted in immigration. But the nationalist narrative vis-a-vis the Habs has not died off in some quarters even though the sociological conditions that created it are long gone. Somehow the Habs are STILL supposed to be the vehicle compensating for humiliations and oppressions that no longer exist.

A further pathology of this kind of nationalist hangover is that it contributes to a willful blindness about the real problems. For instance, in hockey terms, the real question is less why the Habs don't have francophone stars than why there are so few elite-level hockey players being produced in Quebec these days. But asking that question might require some self-critical analysis. Easier just to blame The English (read, the Habs and their owners).

It's at best juvenile and at worst racist. Tremblay is both, I fear.

Easy Ryder: no question the Habs should try to scoop up elite talent that comes from their own backyard. That makes good business sense AND good hockey sense. Everybody can agree on that. What's idiotic is attributing the Habs' failures on this score to an intentional effort to 'abuse Quebecers.' This is the emotionally stunted nationalist paranoia that fuels Neanderthals like Tremblay and the knuckle-dragging talk show callers to whom he appeals.

this is worth restating ---- AMAZING explanation. :clap:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bring back 'les Nordiques'!!!

Quebec deserves its old franchise back!

It would be awesome to see it again... for the sake of Quebec, Canada and Montreal Canadiens fan alike.

Matts

First they should build a rink....

What has that city done to desearve a team back?

A bunch of whining about losing it but still no new rink....

If my kids desearved everything they whined for I would be broke!

Winnepeg however does desearves their team back!

They have the new venue and the fan base to back it.

Hated the Nords and don't miss them in the least!

Even the AHL didn't work in that town.

Jr hockey is what they "desearve".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
First they should build a rink....

What has that city done to desearve a team back?

A bunch of whining about losing it but still no new rink....

If my kids desearved everything they whined for I would be broke!

Winnepeg however does desearves their team back!

They have the new venue and the fan base to back it.

Hated the Nords and don\'t miss them in the least!

Even the AHL didn\'t work in that town.

Jr hockey is what they \"desearve\".

Yeah you might be right in that they don\'t deserve an NHL franchise... but that is for the league to ultimately decide.

My point simply is that a large piece of the heart of Quebec left when the Nordiques left for Colorado. I could be wrong but Bettman didn\'t give this team much of a chance at staying in comparison with what has recently happened in Phoenix.

Perhaps this may be some of the root of the angst you read about in the french media... Quite frankly I don\'t blame them for being upset... if this indeed is a reason.

Matts

Edited by matsnaslundsuperfn

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Two wrongs don't make a right. Just because the Nords left doesn't give french people carté blanche to go after the habs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Two wrongs don't make a right. Just because the Nords left doesn't give french people carté blanche to go after the habs.

I'm not sure what you mean by wrong.

Because the Nordiques have left the Montreal Canadiens are what's left in Quebec... so if their is any hockey angst, the Canadiens will be subject to a high critique level wether we like it or not. Carte blanche is freedom of speech. We Habs fans have to put up with it but at the same time, it would be nice if the french media realized that they are not only writting to the Quebec french speaking population but to the rest of Canada as well. I think sensitivity towards both sides of this is issue is what is needed both by the media and the people who read and/or watch it on tv.

I'm trying hard to understand.

Matts

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What I meant was, because they lost their team they should not take their angst out on the habs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Personally , the way I see this in comparison, would be like if a african american person hated and held grudges towards caucasions today because of what happened many years ago with slavery. I mean of course it was horrible what they did, but at the same time both sides involved are either long dead or if there are any few remainders, I hope they see now that where all the same, and no matter where you go on this earth there will be a equal amount of, "bung holes" here as there is anywhere.. On that very note I believe that it is the differences between us whether its gender or race, that make us great and unique. if everyone was the same then none of us would be special or better skilled at anything, we would be robots.

Me personally my parents were born in Lebanon, and right now anyone from that area of the world is considered by most to be "up to something", but I was born in Canada and I have been a Montreal fan as long as I can remember. When I have went to Montreal the people, the city its amazing, I would rather see that then read some war monglers opinions who probably is just doing it for publicity, and to get people talking. I say much like a bully if everyone ignores them eventually they stop.

Go Habs Go!!!!!! :hlogo:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Personally , the way I see this in comparison, would be like if a african american person hated and held grudges towards caucasions today because of what happened many years ago with slavery. I mean of course it was horrible what they did, but at the same time both sides involved are either long dead or if there are any few remainders, I hope they see now that where all the same, and no matter where you go on this earth there will be a equal amount of, "bung holes" here as there is anywhere.. On that very note I believe that it is the differences between us whether its gender or race, that make us great and unique. if everyone was the same then none of us would be special or better skilled at anything, we would be robots.

Me personally my parents were born in Lebanon, and right now anyone from that area of the world is considered by most to be "up to something", but I was born in Canada and I have been a Montreal fan as long as I can remember. When I have went to Montreal the people, the city its amazing, I would rather see that then read some war monglers opinions who probably is just doing it for publicity, and to get people talking. I say much like a bully if everyone ignores them eventually they stop.

Go Habs Go!!!!!! :hlogo:

Hmmm... ignoring the issue did not end slavery, ignoring the issue of racism will not put an end to it. At the very least this guys article has got us all talking about a very sensitive issue. Perhaps our discussions, getting our thoughts out on Habsworld could be the start of something very productive in french and english canada relationships... Perhaps only one team in Quebec is good after all. We wouldn't be able to ignore this issue because of another team in Quebec city shares the media coverage.

I know this is all a stretch, but one can dream, can't he?

Matts

Edited by matsnaslundsuperfn

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hmmm... ignoring the issue did not end slavery, ignoring the issue of racism will not put an end to it. At the very least this guys article has got us all talking about a very sensitive issue. Perhaps our discussions, getting our thoughts out on Habsworld could be the start of something very productive in french and english canada relationships... Perhaps only one team in Quebec is good after all. We wouldn't be able to ignore this issue because of another team in Quebec city shares the media coverage.

I know this is all a stretch, but one can dream, can't he?

Matts

True very good point.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice going CC. Kudos. I can see how Quebecers can view les Canadiens as 'nous' and understand the feeling that nous should look and sound like nous. This is a part of the bigger problem of professional sports and identity.

I personally aged as a kid , as opposed to 'grew up' in Montreal and the Habs are a part of my identity as Montrealer, not as a 'sports fan.

So, I understand the impulse. The club, to be the club must be sensitive to the clubmembers , the locals who give the club its raison d'etre and I hope and in fact am confident that they will continue to be as sensitive as reality permits to nous.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Personally , the way I see this in comparison, would be like if a african american person hated and held grudges towards caucasions today because of what happened many years ago with slavery. I mean of course it was horrible what they did, but at the same time both sides involved are either long dead or if there are any few remainders, I hope they see now that where all the same, and no matter where you go on this earth there will be a equal amount of, "bung holes" here as there is anywhere.. On that very note I believe that it is the differences between us whether its gender or race, that make us great and unique. if everyone was the same then none of us would be special or better skilled at anything, we would be robots.

Me personally my parents were born in Lebanon, and right now anyone from that area of the world is considered by most to be "up to something", but I was born in Canada and I have been a Montreal fan as long as I can remember. When I have went to Montreal the people, the city its amazing, I would rather see that then read some war monglers opinions who probably is just doing it for publicity, and to get people talking. I say much like a bully if everyone ignores them eventually they stop.Go Habs Go!!!!!! :hlogo:

Another spin on this is the general western redneck opinion of Quebcois. I am from Western Canada, and I can tell you that when I tell people about how Montreal is my favourite Canadian city, over Vancouver, I get the same crap every time. "Ya, once you learn French! If you don't speak French, they won't even talk to you, even though they know English!" or "Ya but all those guys are rude and arrogant!" You would not believe the ignorrance I hear from people here. I can personollay say that, while I understand a bit of French, it is almost impossible for me to comunicate in French, unless the other person has the time to slow down and speak with me. I didn't speak French with anyone there, and I can safely say that Montreal is a Great city. It is social, I feel safe there, and it is very beautiful. I never once felt out of place. St Katherines is a busy street. If you walk in Granville street, Yonge street, or Whyte Ave, I guarantee you won't feel as safe as St. Katherines. That may be a false sense, but I really felt that way. Shopping and dining was the same. A lot of very friendly, open and genuine people, willing to have a great conversation with you. And it does not have the big box sameness that I have seen in every other north american city I have ever been.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
This may be the best post you have ever written CC. :clap:

That's setting the bar pretty low :lol: but thanks for all the kind remarks about my little post.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...