Jump to content

Player Taxes in NHL


SwissHabs
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hello,

Here are the taxes that pay our Canadiens in Montreal an a comparaison with other franchises.

http://swisshabs.blo...ans-la-nhl.html

Though the rates are high, the graphic doesn't take into effect any of the personal deductions available to the players (such as basic personal amount, spousal, child, etc). For someone like Darche (making the minimum), this would drop another $20,000+ off taxable income, yielding a savings of $10,000 or more, which, if you were to recalculate total taxes relative to income, it would affect the flat 48.22% rate. (I just finished doing some tax returns yesterday hence why this is in my head.) I'm not too familiar with the US system so without factoring in these available deductions, you can't quite get the full picture. Still, it's a good reference table to have when the inevitable argument of "Why didn't ____ sign with the Habs?" comes up, thanks for the link.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Interesting that the Habs pay basically the same as the Rangers, but the latter is a haven for UFAs while taxes are traditionally cited as one factor that works against Montreal. I suppose New York City has its own massive appeal, an appeal that Montreal can't really match despite its superior bagels and smoked meat. Also we are only marginally worse (3%) than LA, San Jose and Anaheim, also teams that seem to be perfectly attractive to UFAs.

Equally interesting: for all that Canadians like to THINK they pay higher taxes than Americans, this graphic suggests something quite different. Don't tell the Conservatives and their right-wing allies that.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Interesting that the Habs pay basically the same as the Rangers, but the latter is a haven for UFAs while taxes are traditionally cited as one factor that works against Montreal. I suppose New York City has its own massive appeal, an appeal that Montreal can't really match despite its superior bagels and smoked meat. Also we are only marginally worse (3%) than LA, San Jose and Anaheim, also teams that seem to be perfectly attractive to UFAs.

Equally interesting: for all that Canadians like to THINK they pay higher taxes than Americans, this graphic suggests something quite different. Don't tell the Conservatives and their right-wing allies that.

Apart from taxes, Montreal also suffers from cold weather, French, and crazy media.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've always thought it would be a good idea to make the salary cap an "after tax" cap. I.e the cap is calculated on salaries after taxes are paid.

I thought that would take the whole tax thing out of the equation in terms of attracting ufa's. Obviously the owners in high tax areas would have to pay more so I guess that may be a reason why they don't do it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've always thought it would be a good idea to make the salary cap an "after tax" cap. I.e the cap is calculated on salaries after taxes are paid.

I thought that would take the whole tax thing out of the equation in terms of attracting ufa's. Obviously the owners in high tax areas would have to pay more so I guess that may be a reason why they don't do it.

A good idea and a good explanation of why this idea likely will not come to pass.

In truth, I don't think the Habs ARE unattractive to free agents anymore. While I have no doubt that SOME players are scared away by all the insanity, Montreal is the BOMB when you're doing well, and the fact remains we had no trouble running the table on UFAs in 2009-10. The real problem for the previous decade was most likely that the Habs just plain sucked ass. Since we now have a rep as a team that reliably makes the playoffs and is always competitive, I don't see UFA appeal as too big an issue going forward. Perhaps the only difference is that UFAs make the Canadiens compensate for the tax differential in their contracts, which they presumably don't do in places like NY.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What I find misleading about that statistic is Carey Price is playing taxes. He's a member of the first nations, therefore tax exempt in Canada.

Depends if he lived long enough on a "réserve" to be included.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Depends if he lived long enough on a "réserve" to be included.

never needed to live on a reserve to benefit from it.

also nhl'ers file tax returns with every city/state that they play in because they are a paid on a per-day basis. so a habs player will not declare all of his salary in Quebec.

Edited by fromage
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Non-Status might be because he's the child of a white dad and an aboriginal mom. I can't remember all the details, but there was an incredibly sexist clause built into the original Indian Act about who qualifies for status Indians, and basically it meant that it was okay for an aboriginal male to marry a non-aboriginal and have his kids carry on being status Indians, but not for an aboriginal female. This has been a very contentious issue and that could be the reason for Price's non-status.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Non-Status might be because he's the child of a white dad and an aboriginal mom. I can't remember all the details, but there was an incredibly sexist clause built into the original Indian Act about who qualifies for status Indians, and basically it meant that it was okay for an aboriginal male to marry a non-aboriginal and have his kids carry on being status Indians, but not for an aboriginal female. This has been a very contentious issue and that could be the reason for Price's non-status.

My friends children are 25% native and have a status card and he has never lived on a reserve. If Price wanted a status card, he could likely get one.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

never needed to live on a reserve to benefit from it.

How old are you ?

My friends children are 25% native and have a status card and he has never lived on a reserve. If Price wanted a status card, he could likely get one.

Gotte be the Xth generation of native to receive a status card automaticaly, Passed that Xth generation, you have to be living one full year on a reserve. Well, that's what twins friends of mine with 25% of native blood told me a few years ago.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

How old are you ?

Gotte be the Xth generation of native to receive a status card automaticaly, Passed that Xth generation, you have to be living one full year on a reserve. Well, that's what twins friends of mine with 25% of native blood told me a few years ago.

You aren't tax exempt just for being a status Indian. The money has to be earned on the reserve in order to be exempt. I believe it is that way across Canada.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Non-Status might be because he's the child of a white dad and an aboriginal mom. I can't remember all the details, but there was an incredibly sexist clause built into the original Indian Act about who qualifies for status Indians, and basically it meant that it was okay for an aboriginal male to marry a non-aboriginal and have his kids carry on being status Indians, but not for an aboriginal female. This has been a very contentious issue and that could be the reason for Price's non-status.

This is absolutely correct. The purpose of this would appear sexist, but I believe it was in an effort to reduce the number of status Aborigionals. When you think about it, how many Native dudes have you meant with caucasian wives? I have seen several Native women with caucasian husbands. This was probably even more prolific during the time that the Indian act was written.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

20 years old. never was a poor choice of words. i meant never under the current rules.

i have many natives in my family in both the US and Canada.

ok , I was asking just to see if you could tell me if what my friends told me was correct.

That if you are passed, let's say, the 5th native generation, you have to go live on a reserve for a full year to benefit the taxes exemption ?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I believe that your father must be a Status indian in order for you to qualify in the first place, as Saskhab said, so it doesn't matter how many generations are removed in this case. Also, as I said, the money must be earned on the reserve in order to recieve tax ememption for it. The idea that your native buddy that sits across from you is tax exempt, is incorrect.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

ok , I was asking just to see if you could tell me if what my friends told me was correct.

That if you are passed, let's say, the 5th native generation, you have to go live on a reserve for a full year to benefit the taxes exemption ?

only 1 of your parents has to be status natives in order for the offspring to become one so generation doesn't matter. you can only gain the status if there is a consecutive lineage in your family of status natives, meaning if either your mother or your father are status natives, you're eligible, but if neither of them are, regardless of how you can prove your native lineage, it won't fly.

i wouldn't know much about taxes exemptions, that's not typically something i discuss with my native family. unfortunately, i do not qualify for status native :(

Edited by fromage
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...