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Habs vs. Boston | Game Thread


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SK actually got moved up to the 2nd line last night in the 3rd. Kovy moved down with Lang.

Sk played well last night, he atleast went into the corners and worked hard. I didn't have a problem with him last night.

He was a D score on a team with a bunch of F's.

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I will continue Latendresse bashing - because hes another that does absolutely nothing out there.

I guess some people will always have somthing against Guillaume. He was one of the few guys who actually showed up last night, and yet you manage to find a way to bi.tch at his performance!?

What I'm really pissed about is not the fact that they lost, but more the WAY they lost. A total no show. That's three pathetic performances in 4 games. The boys aren't putting in the effort that is needed.

Lastly, I'm kinda pissed at Laraque. We went out and got him for big money, and he's expected to defend our skilled players, and Komisarek is the one who has to fight Lucic the goon? FV.CK NO!!! Komi might be a tough d-man who can give huge bodychecks and block shots, but he's not there to fight. DO any of you remember Scott Stevens fighting very often? I don't. And now, because of Laraque's non fight with Lucic, Komisarek is injured(i heard it this mornign on the Team 990)

God damn moth.. fv..ing sack of shit!!!I'm still pissed! :wall::wall:

Lucic, had better get his helmet strapped on tight for next saturday, I fully expect somebody on this team(cough laraque cough) to take him out. Teach the little piece of shit a lesson!!

Oh yeah, I almost forgot. I hope Dandy won't play tomorrow. Get Stevie B. In there. Dandy was the reason for the first Boston goal. Instead of leaving the puck to Komi, he moved towards it, and caused some confusion...which lead to Thornton's goal!

Edited by Habsfan
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All the Lucic bashing. I wish he was on the Habs. Fanpuck was right, at least he shows emotion.

Komi is a big boy, if he is going to dish it out, he should be able to take it. He got whipped.

The really funny thing is fans saying "be carefull next game". The fact is the Habs should have taken care of itr last night.

The Bruins are now bigger, tougher then the habs. They don't respect them anymore.

It's up to the Habs to change it. I haven't seen enough this year to see that happening.

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They don't respect them anymore.

How can the Bruins not respect the habs, when they've won 1 of the last 13 games against the Habs??? Your statement doesn't make much sense! The bruins were hugrier last night because they were tired of being embarassed by the Habs. This embarassment at the hands of the Habs had been going on for over 18 months. They just wanted it more last night, and our boys (most of them) took the night off!

As far as Kovy is concerned... I agree that he's not playing as well as last year, but we have to remember that Kovy got 47 of his 84 points on the PP last year(56% of his points). The guy thrives on the PP. Last night the habs had 4 minutes on the PP, and Kovy was out there for 41 seconds. That is not normal.

Now I'm not saying that Kovy is beyond reproach, but I can definitely understand his frustration.

Edited by Habsfan
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Watch the rest of the series this year. I'm saying now that they beat them, the respect level has went down alot.

I think that respect level went down after the 7 game series. The Bruins went in knowing last night they were going to hand them a whipping.

The Canadiens came nowhere close to matching the intensity level that the Bruins brought, if this trend continues this team will struggle

to win the division.

THey better stop reading their bloody press clippings and realize that this season people are gunning for them, they are not going to be

handed anything. They have now been embarrased two times in a span of 5 days, it is great that they dominated a gutless Sens team,

but the longer they rest on their laurels the longer they are going to be whipped by inferior teams.

The Wings are not great because they have great talent. They are great because they have great talent and an unmatched commitment level.

Listen to any of the late 70s habs and they will tell you the reason they never lost was because they knew they were the best, and they

were dedicated to prove it EVERY SINGLE NIGHT. They hated to lose and would do anything they could to avoid losing.

This team is soft, not because of size, not because of willingness to muck it up in the dirty areas of the ice, but because they will not do

whatever it takes to win. They were handed two lessons in the playoffs and failed to learn, they have been now handed back to back

lessons this week. If this team wants to earn the praise it has been getting, time to increase their commitment and desire to win.

Otherwise we are looking at a repeat of the Ottawa Senators and their 10 year debacle.

Edited by Wamsley01
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Watch the rest of the series this year. I'm saying now that they beat them, the respect level has went down alot.

I guess we'll have to wait and See!!

By the way, what do y'all think the Flyers will do Saturday night?? (i'll be at the Game tomorrow) The Flyers will watch the video from this game and will try to imitate the bruins.

Forecheck aggressiveley! Put pressure on our D-men, who can't seem to get the puck out of our zone. Hit every red white and Blue sweater out there and crash into Carey Price all night. DO those three things, and you shouldn't have a problem with the habs!

I sure Hope Carbo and the Coaching staff will talk some sense into our boys, cause if things stay the same much longer this could get real ugly!

Otherwise we are looking at a repeat of the Ottawa Senators and their 10 year debacle.

PLease NO!!! Now that would be humiliating!

I will pray to the Hockey gods tonight and hope that our boys wake up!

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I don't get the posts putting down Lucic because he wouldn't fight BGL.

He has battled hard with Komi for two seasons. Komi is a big, hard hitting man. They had good reason to fight each other.

We are sad because Komi got his ass handed to him, BADLY.

Crappy game :puke:

If you missed the fight:

http://habsinsideout.com/main/10786

How badly did he really lose? Lucic's hand is hurting like a son of a bitch today and the trainer had to clean blood off of Komi's helmet :-)

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We need to bring up CHIPS!

True honest character. True honest skill. True honest grit. True honest toughness. He can take care of himself and his mates and bring intensity that this team needs. Not a one week "let's see how he does" kind of thing.

CHIPS! CHIPS! CHIPS! CHIPS!

I think that would be the most important and beneficial move this team makes this season.

We need an honest player to step into the dressing room and call it like it is, and Chips would be that guy if he could get an honest chance.

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The Wings are not great because they have great talent. They are great because they have great talent and an unmatched commitment level.

I fully agree that the Red Wings don’t have superior talent (with the exception of Lidstrom, and maybe also now with the addition of Hossa who wasn’t there in the past), however the difference goes far beyond the commitment level. They go into games fully prepared. They know how their opponents play and what they need to do to win. They have a strong system (and by system I don’t mean telling the players to skate and work hard) and strategies that are well communicated to players, and they make sure everyone knows his role.

There are two quotes from Scott Niedermayer that reflect this very well:

“He’s a coach who always has his teams prepared going into a game. We always were aware of what he other team was doing and what we needed to do”.

I may be wrong about this, but I don’t believe that the Canadiens have a strong game plan adapted to their opponents, honestly I’m not even sure there is any strategy besides skating in a North-South fashion, working hard, and trying to hit everyone we can (regardless if it’s actually beneficial to the situation).

”I really enjoyed playing for Mike. He was a guy that you knew where you stood with him. He put that out there loud and clear. He’s one of my favourite coaches that I played for.”

That last quote shows a world of difference with the way Carbonneau coaches in Montreal where a disconcerting large number of players have mentioned they had no idea what the coaching staff expected from them, what they were doing wrong, or what they had to so to get back into the lineup. The latest is Steve Bégin, a regular for the last several years who seems to have no clue why he’s not playing, what he needs to do to get back into the lineup, or what his current role is within the team. Some others include Michael Ryder whom according to him no one talk to, guys like Perezhogin and Samsonov who didn’t what was expected of them on the ice, Latendresse whom according to him Carbonneau hardly ever talked to during his rookie season (you have to work with a 19 year old you graduated early, and communicate constantly with him so that he grows as a player), Rivet who showed up to learn he was a healthy scratch only a few hours before a game, and a few others like Dandeneault or even some youngsters who were sent down without being told what they did wrong and needed to work on.

There is one thing I truly hate from Guy Carbonneau, and it’s the way he distances himself from the players. After a loss, he systematically criticizes his players for the lack of effort – in front of the media – sometimes almost trying to humiliate them by saying things such as “Muller and I can’t jump on the ice for them”. It basically shows that he’s not willing to re-evaluate his own work, decisions, and strategies.

Again I see a huge contrast with a coach like Mike Babcock. I was reading some post-game scripts and interviews from Babcock from the last playoffs, and he almost always uses the term “WE” in the sense that the players AND himself have to take a look at what didn’t go se well, and what needs to be addressed. You can sense that he and the players form a united group, and that win or lose, it is a group effort.

Babcock is also capable to analyze why the team didn’t have so much success at a technical level instead of systematically blaming a lack of effort. For example after a loss against the Penguins during the finals, he explained after the game that Pittsburgh did a great job boxing his players, and how that lead to a very high number of shots, but very few quality chances:

“Two things, I'm not a big believer in letting the goalie outplay you. I think when you do, you have to look at yourself and make sure it doesn't happen again. We can't miss the net 41 times like we did.

Pound it off him, get a second chance. They're doing a good job trying to box out, and we have to make sure we're going there and being relentless at their net. And that will be our focus and our plan.”

I just love this one because this is exactly what happened to us against the Flyers (or even Boston), however our coach simply blamed the lack of effort, failed to see this on a technical level, and thus never made the necessary adjustments which lead us to losing the series.

Mike Babcock mentioned three things that the Detroit system is made of (in order):

1. Work ethic

2. Structure

3. Talent

We have the work ethic (this is something Carbonneau has done very well, getting everyone working hard every game, and creating good team chemistry) and the talent… but we have no structure whatsoever… again last night I saw a lot of players working hard, but really just individually; as a whole we’re a mess…

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I didn't see the game, but the results (and the comments here) speak for themselves.

I agree that bringing up a young player or two might inject an element of enthusiasm and hunger into this lineup. It's a possible short-term tweak that could help. Were you to sit out a bigger-name player in favour of a call-up it might send a further message.

Remember Gainey's long-standing belief in internal competition? This is the first year in a long time where practically every player is guaranteed his roster spot. So one thing that could be going on is that we have a lot of young players who have been battling for the last couple of seasons to establish themselves as NHL players and to solidify their place on the roster (as top-6 forwards, as role-players, etc). Having done that, they have, deep down, a sense of "mission accomplished" and are not yet prepared, psychologically, to re-focus on the goal of becoming champions. It could take a season or two for this to happen. Which sucks, because as I say, this team as presently constituted doesn't have a big window.

Indeed, many things could be going on here. One is that these guys have read and internalized its press clippings, as many have suggested, and is too young (or soft) to realize that they haven't proven, let along won, A THING yet. Brutalization by the coaches would go some distance to correcting this.

A third, related possibility is that the coaches need to make some more general adjustments in how they prepare their players. This gets to CC's amazing post above, which captures a bunch of legitimate questions relating to Carbo's coaching.

A fourth possibility - maybe the most disturbing one - is that this is a team moulded in the image of Alexei Kovalev. Kovalev is the quinessential example of a player who knows that he has more skill than anyone else and often loses interest in proving it night after night. Is it just a coincidence that the team on which he is a dominant presence reflects that same tendency? Ain't that a worrisome thought?

A fifth and related explanation may just be that we have too many of the wrong type of player, too many guys who don't want to pay the price and win those one on one battles. Soft players. If so, then a trade is the way to go.

Finally, KoZed may be right and this is a healthy part of the process of truly learning how to win. Let's hope so.

Edited by The Chicoutimi Cucumber
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I just read on François Gagnon's blog on cyberpresse.ca that Not only did Komisarek hurt his right hand in his fight with Lucic, but that Lucic may have injured S. Kostitsyn last night. (with a solid body-check) Both players were absent from pratice today.

Had big George done his jb and pounded Lucic's face early in the game, maybe Sergei and Mike might not be injured this morning!?

Edited by Habsfan
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I just read on François Gagnon's blog on cyberpresse.ca that Not only did Komisarek hurt his right hand in his fight with Lucic, but that Lucic may have injured S. Kostitsyn last night. (with a solid body-check) Both players were absent from pratice today.

Had big George done his jb and pounded Lucic's face early in the game, maybe Sergei and Mike might not be injured this morning!?

I completely agree... where the heck is BGL ? So far his signing has been completely useless and irrelavant. He can't skate and now his presence doesn't even show ?

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I would have to agree that i was very excited when the Habs signed BGL.

However, so far he has been a disappointment.

Last nite if he didn't get a chance to fight someone then he shoulds pummelled some B's with some nasty hits, but no he didn't. Better get his ass in gear or i would have him up in the pressbox.

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Well i do agree with your points on Laraque but GC isn't using him right. Every time Lucic came on the ice Laraque should have been the winger. It happened once.

The reason he was so good last year is he played alot, he rode shot gun with Crosby and malkin when needed.

If he plays 2 shifts a period against another 4th line it's just 2 fighters going at it.

He needs more ice time, as i said earlier, he doesn't hurt you out there and doesn't take dumb penalties let him play.

So i'll blame his lack of icetime, and that's on the coach.

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I will continue Latendresse bashing - because hes another that does absolutely nothing out there.

What happened to all the power skating thru the summer?

Hes a big kid that should be able to hit - at least get a good shot on net or something --- nada!

Those comments are an embarrassment. At least try to make it look like you thought out some plausible excuse to bash a player first.

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I fully agree that the Red Wings don’t have superior talent (with the exception of Lidstrom, and maybe also now with the addition of Hossa who wasn’t there in the past), however the difference goes far beyond the commitment level. They go into games fully prepared. They know how their opponents play and what they need to do to win. They have a strong system (and by system I don’t mean telling the players to skate and work hard) and strategies that are well communicated to players, and they make sure everyone knows his role.

There are two quotes from Scott Niedermayer that reflect this very well:

“He’s a coach who always has his teams prepared going into a game. We always were aware of what he other team was doing and what we needed to do”.

I may be wrong about this, but I don’t believe that the Canadiens have a strong game plan adapted to their opponents, honestly I’m not even sure there is any strategy besides skating in a North-South fashion, working hard, and trying to hit everyone we can (regardless if it’s actually beneficial to the situation).

”I really enjoyed playing for Mike. He was a guy that you knew where you stood with him. He put that out there loud and clear. He’s one of my favourite coaches that I played for.”

That last quote shows a world of difference with the way Carbonneau coaches in Montreal where a disconcerting large number of players have mentioned they had no idea what the coaching staff expected from them, what they were doing wrong, or what they had to so to get back into the lineup. The latest is Steve Bégin, a regular for the last several years who seems to have no clue why he’s not playing, what he needs to do to get back into the lineup, or what his current role is within the team. Some others include Michael Ryder whom according to him no one talk to, guys like Perezhogin and Samsonov who didn’t what was expected of them on the ice, Latendresse whom according to him Carbonneau hardly ever talked to during his rookie season (you have to work with a 19 year old you graduated early, and communicate constantly with him so that he grows as a player), Rivet who showed up to learn he was a healthy scratch only a few hours before a game, and a few others like Dandeneault or even some youngsters who were sent down without being told what they did wrong and needed to work on.

There is one thing I truly hate from Guy Carbonneau, and it’s the way he distances himself from the players. After a loss, he systematically criticizes his players for the lack of effort – in front of the media – sometimes almost trying to humiliate them by saying things such as “Muller and I can’t jump on the ice for them”. It basically shows that he’s not willing to re-evaluate his own work, decisions, and strategies.

Again I see a huge contrast with a coach like Mike Babcock. I was reading some post-game scripts and interviews from Babcock from the last playoffs, and he almost always uses the term “WE” in the sense that the players AND himself have to take a look at what didn’t go se well, and what needs to be addressed. You can sense that he and the players form a united group, and that win or lose, it is a group effort.

Babcock is also capable to analyze why the team didn’t have so much success at a technical level instead of systematically blaming a lack of effort. For example after a loss against the Penguins during the finals, he explained after the game that Pittsburgh did a great job boxing his players, and how that lead to a very high number of shots, but very few quality chances:

“Two things, I'm not a big believer in letting the goalie outplay you. I think when you do, you have to look at yourself and make sure it doesn't happen again. We can't miss the net 41 times like we did.

Pound it off him, get a second chance. They're doing a good job trying to box out, and we have to make sure we're going there and being relentless at their net. And that will be our focus and our plan.”

I just love this one because this is exactly what happened to us against the Flyers (or even Boston), however our coach simply blamed the lack of effort, failed to see this on a technical level, and thus never made the necessary adjustments which lead us to losing the series.

Mike Babcock mentioned three things that the Detroit system is made of (in order):

1. Work ethic

2. Structure

3. Talent

We have the work ethic (this is something Carbonneau has done very well, getting everyone working hard every game, and creating good team chemistry) and the talent… but we have no structure whatsoever… again last night I saw a lot of players working hard, but really just individually; as a whole we’re a mess…

Outstanding post :clap:

Maybe the Habs organization could use Scotty Bowman on a consultant basis. Help our coaches learn and grow.

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Well i do agree with your points on Laraque but GC isn't using him right. Every time Lucic came on the ice Laraque should have been the winger. It happened once.

The reason he was so good last year is he played alot, he rode shot gun with Crosby and malkin when needed.

If he plays 2 shifts a period against another 4th line it's just 2 fighters going at it.

He needs more ice time, as i said earlier, he doesn't hurt you out there and doesn't take dumb penalties let him play.

So i'll blame his lack of icetime, and that's on the coach.

The problem is that Milan Lucic plays over 15 minutes a game (and it will probably increase over time), and usually with some good quality teammates (i.e. Bergeron and Kessel) so you can't match Laraque with those guys. He may be barely good enough to not hurt you on the ice, but he's not helping you either. Also when he jumps on the ice then it's likely his even more useless linemate Dandeneault also will; of course you could play Laraque on a top offensive line, but then you're likely weakening that line while a better player like Latendresse or Sergei Kostsitsyn ends up on the forth line.

This is why goons are useless... luckily we have guys like Stewart, Conboy, Quailer, Pacioretty, McDonagh, Stejskal, Chipchura, and a couple more who can play hockey, show some toughness, and are willing to drop the gloves to defend a teammate when necessary.

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Its all nice, but Detroit had a winning tradition long before Babcock took the reigns of the team. The organization built a winner up and has maintained it there since. It took a long time to go from a league doormat (85-86) to a serious, constant contender (91-92). It started with Yzerman accepting to play a more complete 2-way game, it took the drafting and development of top talent (Fedorov, Lidstrom, Konstantinov, Primeau, Kozlov, Chiasson) and the addition of old grizzled vets (Ciccarelli, Coffey), but even after Detroit became a top contender (98, 103, 100 pts seasons from 91-92 to 93-94), it still took them three years of playoffs failures before finaly reaching the Finals (94-95) and two more years before winning the damn Cup.

So from a league doormat (85-86) to an inconsistent team (87 to 91) to a contender (92-95) to a Cup contender (95-97) took over 10 years to build, and it took half those years to shape the franchise long-term core (Yzerman, Fedorov, Lidstrom, Konstantinov, Draper, Maltby, McCarty, Lapointe, Brown, Errey) into a team (ie. a group of players sticking together) that could achieve success with the help of a few, well-targetted key acquisitions (Shanaha, Larionov, etc.), . It didnt happen overnight. It took time (5+ years), it took stability (core was kept together the entire time, Bowman stayed in place 10 years), it took patience to learn from the errors and mistakes and failures and grow from that.

And that same group of players who had been drafted, developped, broke into the NHL and had learned together to go from an average team to a Cup winner stayed together from the mid 90's to the early 2000's. Last year's edition still had Lidstrom, Holmstrom, Draper, McCarty, Maltby, Chelios, Osgood that had been there 10 years before that. What they had learned in the struggles of the early 90's, and the experience they had gained when they became Cup contenders year after year in the mid 90's; they passed on to the Zetterbergs and Datsyuks and Franzens and Kronwalls.

That, more than anything else, is what breeds and perpetuate winners. Winning veterans transmitting their attitude and work ethic to the young guys. It's what used to make the Habs so great, the transmission of winning values from a generation to the next. it's the Habs motto! "To you from failing hands we throw the torch"? It's what kept the Habs on top of the league from 53 to 93.

That is way, way, way more important and valuable than any coaching system. We've seen enough one-year wonder coaches (Carlyle, Tortorella, Laviolette, Hartley, Crawford) to know that little depends on them and a whole lot depends on the guys in the room and they leadership they have amongst themselves.

So regardless of Babcock's good job, it's that if a kid picks his ass or a newly acquired vet starts to coast, you've got Lidstrom, Draper, Maltby, McCarty, Holmstrom, Chelios, Osgood & Co. --who have all been through Hell and back together for 10+ years now -- who can all tell the culprit to get his ass in gear, who can all exude confidence in the room and calm on the bench when the going gets rough.

Who do the Habs have? Tanguay? Kovy? Breezer? Nobody has won together as part of the same team, nobody has even been playing together for a long time. If you want to draw comparisons, right now the Habs are at the stage the Wings were back in 92-93. They've just had their first great season with their new core of young players and few old vets. Now they're in the stage when they have to learn how to lose in order to learn how to win. They need the stability, they need coaches who'll tell them when the going gets rough "Tough it out, we're here to stay, you're here to stay, we're in this together for the long haul so the only way to make this work is to win".

I know we're living in a time, when everybody wants everything to fall on their lap NOW and that patience and slow, tough, meticulous progress through hardships and trials isnt sexy, especially a large portion of rabid Habs fans who are so irrational and short-sighted they want to crucify any player after a couple of subpar games or change coaches after every humiliating loss or trade everyone that isnt playing like a superstar. But if the past has taught us anything, it's that you need to go through the crap first before you can learn from it, build on it and benefit from it.

And if the Habs have any hopes of returning to the past glory of teams from the 50's or 60's or 70's or even the 80's, they'll have to take the long hard road back up to the mountain top and there's no shortcuts to get there. That means stability, that means patience, that means keeping the coaching staff in place and have the top staff back them 100% so the players have to realize they wont suck their way out of their responsibilities as pro athletes because the bench boss wont be gone tomorrow. That means keeping as many players together and have them suffer humiliation as a group, become hungry as a group, win as a group, think as a group; not ship players in and out of the city on a whim when things arent clicking after just a handful of weeks.

That also means keeping your sh*t together after a couple of bad losses. Some fans have got to stop missing the forrest for the trees and overreact like kids getting a booboo after every bad game or every setback.

The bigger picture is to have a contending team year after year after year. Not just tomorrow, not just this season; but for the next 10, 15, 20 years. And that isnt gonna happen with hysterical, knee-jerk, radical reaction after every little bump on the road.

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I actually agree with most of what KoZed said, however that doesn't mean that we just need to wait and hope that this group binds and merges into a well oiled hockey machine. By no mean did I insinuate that Carbonneau should be fired, that would be absolutely ridiculous, however that doesn’t mean he doesn’t need to improve as a coach. If we want to build a strong winning organization in the long run, which is where we’re heading with the superb work of Pierre Boivin, it must start with a solid foundation today.

The Canadiens had an amazing record to start the season despite playing somewhat disorganized hockey. Even the game we won 6-3 against Toronto wasn’t exactly a display of superior hockey, we just score a lot of goals against a weak, confused team that was clearly looking for chemistry and structure. In my opinion we won most games based on superior talent, hard work, and great individual efforts (one night it was Tanguay, another it was Kovalev while sometimes Lang scored some timely goals). While that should be more than good enough for us to contend for first place in the conference, that won’t make us any more ready for the playoffs than we were last year, and doesn’t make us go into the right direction for the future.

As I said, I see a lack of preparation heading into most games, I see a lack of structure on the ice (everyone if playing hard… but dumb), and I feel that the way Carbonneau distances himself from the players after each loss is not good for team chemistry nor its confidence level on the longer run, and it could make him lose the respect of his players, especially the veterans. This is not disapproval of Carbonneau, but only things I feel he needs to work on… after all, he’s also inexperienced and going through a learning/growth process….

So yes to stability and long term goals… but today we still need to do things the right today

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As I said, I see a lack of preparation heading into most games, I see a lack of structure on the ice (everyone if playing hard… but dumb), and I feel that the way Carbonneau distances himself from the players after each loss is not good for team chemistry nor its confidence level on the longer run, and it could make him lose the respect of his players, especially the veterans. This is not disapproval of Carbonneau, but only things I feel he needs to work on… after all, he's also inexperienced and going through a learning/growth process….

I also agree that Carbo has things he can improve. Even Bowman has things to improve after 20 seasons in the League. Always have to adapt to how the game changes and evolves.

However, about Carbo "distancing" himself from the players after losses. One of the first condition of efficient authority (in any field: workplace, school class, policing, etc.) is the maintenance of a certain distance between the boss and the group. Secondly, players have to take responsibilities for their mistakes and losses if you want to have any hope of them not wanting to lose again. For that, the coaches have to keep their distances. It's normal for any human being to try to deflect blame anyway they can. Its basic instinct. But you cant let them deflect it on the coaches or they'll never work to improve themselves. They'll also never pressure each other to improve either. Coaches have to take part of the blame when they really f*cked up, and neither Carbo, Muller or Jarvis ever shyed away from saying they could improve this or that.

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I've been looking forward all week for this game. First match broadcasted over here, been working my ass of all week. Finally have a night off to chill and watch some good hockey. And this is what you get...worst and most pathetic game i've ever seen...

Can't even tell you what player did get his level...

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If Laraque doesn't fight or hit hard (SHOW SOME ######ING EMOTION AND HEART) then I will have given up on one of my favourite, now most frustrating player.

And if he drops 'em with Cote, he may not even win :(

BGL needs to go on a diet, and earn his paycheck.

Edited by MMPL
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